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5 January, 2011

Rex vs. Singh • Jan. 11, Alice Yard

Filed under: film — caiso @ 14:15

Rex vs. Singh

This 30-minute video, by gay, Trinidad-born, Toronto-based Richard Fung, is the story of the 1915 trial of two Sikh mill-workers, Dalip Singh and Naina Singh, entrapped by undercover police in Vancouver, Canada, and accused of sodomy, in four tellings – as period drama, documentary investigation, musical agit-prop, and a deconstruction of the court transcript.

Fung at Canada's Caribbean Tales Film Festival (MEP Caribbean Publishers)

Between 1909 and 1929, an inordinate number of men tried for sodomy in Vancouver were Sikhs.  Rex vs. Singh, a collaboration with Ali Kazimi and John Greyson, explores the little known interplay between homophobia and racism in this chapter of Canadian history, better known through the 1914 “Komogata Maru” incident, in which South Asians tried to challenge efforts to regulate the “brown invasion” of Asian immigrants into Pacific Canada through racist immigration policies such as “continuous journey”. The 2008 film was commissioned by the Vancouver Queer Film Festival.

Much of Fung’s work explores race, family history, migration and gay and Canadian identities. He teaches at Ontario College of Art & Design, and is currently working on a project on roti. Rex vs. Singh will be screened as part of Fung’s talk about this and other work at Alice Yard, 80 Roberts St. (btw. the Woodbrook Playground/Murray St. & Brooklyn Bar/Carlos St.) on Tuesday 11 January at 7:30 pm.

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19 September, 2010

Children of God: a stunning new film about gay life and the Caribbean • Chaguanas (Sep 23) • UWI (Sep 24) • PoS (Sep 25, Oct 4) • Tobago (Oct 3)

Filed under: Caribbean,community voices,faith,film,protest,violence — caiso @ 15:49
Bahamas International Film Festival Opening Night • Miami International Film Festival • Queering Roma  Opening Night • Melbourne Queer Film Festival • BFI London Gay & Lesbian Film Festival Closing Night • Miami GLBT Film Festival • Boston GLBT Film Festival Closing Night • Turin GLBT Film Festival Audience Award Best Narrative • Inside Out Toronto LGBT Film Festival • Fairy Tales Film Festival • Hawaii Rainbow Film Festival Best Film • Ft. Worth Q cinema Best Gay Film • Jacob Burns Film Center Closing Night • NewFest: New York LGBT Film Festival Audience Award Best Narrative • Oakland Black Film Festival Opening Night • QBC International Film Festival Opening Night • Frameline: San Francisco LGBT Film Festival • Philadelphia QFEST • Outfest: Los Angeles LGBT Film Festival • Out Takes: Dallas Lesbian & Gay Film Festival • Budapest Pride • Queer Lisboa • Out on Screen: Vancouver Queer Film+Video Festival • New York International Latino Film Festival • NewFest at BAM • Atlantic City International Film & Music Festival • MGLCC Outflix Programming • Cinema Diverse: The Palm Springs Gay & Lesbian Film Festival • Q Filmfest Indonesia • Tampa International Gay & Lesbian Film Festival • Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival • ImageOut: Rochester LGBT Film & Video Festival • Hamburg International Lesbian & Gay Film Festival • Milwaukee LGBT Film/Video Festival • Rehoboth Beach Film Festival • Puerto Rico Queer Filmfest • Chillfest Jersey City • trinidad+tobago film festival

PLEASE NOTE CORRECTED LOCATIONS FOR OCTOBER 3rd and 4th SCREENINGS
Screenings are $25 at 8:00pm at MovieTowne (Invaders Bay/Price Plaza/Lowlands Mall)

The UWI screening is free and is at 5:00pm at the Institute for Critical Thinking

Children of God is the story of two individuals who learn that in order to live a truly happy life you have to risk speaking and acting on your true feelings, and in order to fulfill your potential you have to risk emotional vulnerability. • Set against the backdrop of a nation grappling with violent homophobia, this film tells the story of Jonny, a Bahamian artist who faces losing his scholarship at a local university, and Lena a conservative religious woman who is struggling with a crumbling marriage. • Rosie O’Donnell’s gay family cruise ship decides to have the Bahamas as a port of call. Mass hysteria divides the island in factions, as some fundamentalists lead widespread rallies. After severe beatings from homophobic bullies, and rejection from his alcoholic father, Jonny escapes from his gritty inner-city life in Nassau to the under populated and dramatic Bahamian island of Eleuthera. Lena Mackey, an extremely conservative forty-year-old anti-gay activist who upon finding out that her husband is not who he represents himself to be, believes that the only way to fix problems in her life is to limit the rights of homosexuals. She heads to Eleuthera for the purpose of galvanizing the community to oppose gay rights. • Their worlds collide. The audience is taken on a journey that is humorous, brave, shocking and a one of a kind surprise ending that will shake them to the core.

Director Kareem Mortimer will speak at the Sep. 24 and 25 screenings. Born in 1981, Mortimer considers himself as an Eleuthera, Long Island, Inagua, and Turks Island, Trinidadian boy. He wrote and served as one of the producers for the 1998 Bahamas Games documentary at the age of 17, and has worked on a number of award-winning films in the US and his native Bahamas since. These include short music documentaries for Hip Hop Nation: Notes from the Underground, the comedy Varmint Day, feature length documentary Where I’m From, short narrative, Chance, The Eleutheran Adventure, Best Documentary at the 2006 Bahamas International Film Festival, the gay-themed short narrative Float, winner of five international awards, Chartered Course: The Life of Sir Durward Knowles, and his most recent film I Am Not A Dummy. A second feature film, Windjammers, is in production, and three others in development. In January, The Independent named Mortimer one of ten directors “to watch”.

Read reviews by Angelique Nixon/Black Camera, Clay Cane/BET, and Nicholas Laughlin/Caribbean Review of Books.

UPDATE: Children of God won the Film Festival’s Jury Prize for “Best Film in the
Spirit of the Caribbean”, as well as the People’s Choice Award for Feature Film

5 July, 2010

Pride (noun) a sense of one’s own worth; the occasion or ground of self-esteem;

self-respect; pleasure or satisfaction taken in an achievement; sexual
desire, esp. in a female animal; a flamboyant or impressive group

July 2010 is the 16th annual celebration of Pride in Trinidad & Tobago
How are you showing yours?

At London Pride this past weekend, one of the first Caribbean young people to head a GLBT campus group in the UK sports his CAISO jersey. The British-born 21-year-old supported CAISO's work by ordering the shirt and making a donation online.

For a fuller calendar of Pride 2010 events, contact Velvet Underground
369-5351 • velvetunderground.tt@gmail.com

July 6
Pride Arts & Craft Workshop I: Paper Making, Clay & Plaster Sculpting

July 7
Friends for Life Pride Chatroom opens

July 8
Financial Planning for the Future 5pm

July 10
Two parties
Lesbian (women only) Pride party
Pride & Prejudice

July 14
Lesbian chatroom

July 15
Pride Arts & Craft Workshop II: Poetry, Music & Dance

July 16 &17
Social events

July 18
Rainbow Movies

July 20
All Fours Competition

July 21
Chatroom: Gay-Straight Alliances

July 23
Velvet Underground Annual Pride pool tournament

July 25
Annual Pride Memorial celebrating the lives, joy,
laughter and memories of our lost brothers and sisters
6 pm, Bohemia

July 28
Chatroom

July 30
CAISO anniversary ecumenical thanksgiving service

July 31
Party

August 14
Tobago Pride/Las Lap

pride audio (prd) KEY

NOUN:

  1. A sense of one’s own proper dignity or value; self-respect.
  2. Pleasure or satisfaction taken in an achievement, possession, or association: parental pride.
  3. Arrogant or disdainful conduct or treatment; haughtiness.
    1. A cause or source of pleasure or satisfaction; the best of a group or class: These soldiers were their country’s pride.
    2. The most successful or thriving condition; prime: the pride of youth.
  4. An excessively high opinion of oneself; conceit.
  5. Mettle or spirit in horses.
  6. A company of lions. See Synonyms at flock1.
  7. A flamboyant or impressive group: a pride of acrobats.

TRANSITIVE VERB:
prid·ed, prid·ing, prides

To indulge (oneself) in a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction: I pride myself on this beautiful garden.

ETYMOLOGY:
Middle English, from Old English prde, from prd, proud ; see proud
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3 April, 2010

CAISO links visiting “Our Caribbean” anthology editor Thomas Glave to T&T GLBT community

Filed under: books,Caribbean,community voices,culture,film,UWI — caiso @ 16:13

As promised, the CAISO/Bohemia gathering for film and conversation continues Sunday April 11th, with Thomas Glave, editor of the historic GLBT anthology Our Caribbean, as host. Phillip Pike‘s Songs of Freedom, the first documentary about gay life in Jamaica, will be screened, along with Coolie Gyal, Renata Mohamed‘s coming-out letter from a Guyanese woman to her parents.

Update: We’re now adding a third film: Campbell X‘s Paradise Lost, a visually beautiful work filmed through the lens of a woman who returns to Trinidad as an adult to ask what it’s like to be gay here. The most amazing stuff is the interviews with her parents. Watch!

Big appreciation to all three filmmakers and to our friends at
SASOD in Guyana for their generous support of the event!!

[SCROLL DOWN BELOW IMAGE FOR MORE]


Earlier that same afternoon Glave will generously offer a free workshop for local GLBT writers of all genders, ages, levels and genres to share in conversations about their vision and experience as writers, and participate in craft-focused exercises and critique. To register, email us or daviddksoomarie@yahoo.com.

Glave’s visit is sponsored by the University of the West Indies Institute for Gender & Development Studies. We’ll post more on events at UWI’s Daaga Hall and Nigel R Khan’s West Mall store featuring him next week.

29 March, 2010

Proud to tell it: Sean Drakes’s film gets T&T talking about pride

Proud to Tell It was a simple idea. In 2002, Sean Drakes, a self-made lifestyle photojournalist, picked up the new video camera he was teaching himself to use and travelled around the US to four Black Pride celebrations, in Washington DC, Los Angeles, New York City and Atlanta. The Black Prides had emerged as ways for African American communities in larger US cities to celebrate GLBT pride on their own cultural terms, often in more inward-focused ways that looked different from the larger, public, White-dominated Pride celebrations that occur around the country every June. Some of the Prides, like L.A.’s, had evolved from a group of friends getting together to throw a beach party.

Drakes had another simple idea earlier this month. In town to photograph Carnival 2010 professionally, he pitched to Bohemia‘s promoters the thought of screening the work-in-progress on the Pride events he had shot in 2002 for community members here in Trinidad. To Drakes’s surprise, within days an ad was up on Facebook, A/V equipment had been ordered, as had stocks for a bar. He pitched in for chairs.

In another seemingly simple gesture, Drakes thought to invite an NGO to facilitate a discussion about the film’s significance for organizing and community in T&T. His idea bounced around CAISO, where one person after another was charged to make it into something grand: tie it into our vision for a project documenting the community’s history? use it to launch a base-building effort that would lead into a campaign for law reform?

We ended up with a really simple discussion. But what a rich discussion it was!

One hundred and twenty people showed up on March 11th. They applauded heartily whenever CAISO was mentioned by name, including when we introduced our logo designer. One person boasted she had supported the group “from Day 1”. Evangelists on Isaac radio, we learned, are still quoting our very first press release.

Parade? A lot of the conversation the film generated was about how ready T&T’s is for the idea of a Pride parade. One participant reminisced back to when Pride in T&T first started 16 years ago (when the idea of march came up and was quickly dismissed), sharing that he never thought he would live to see people think they might be ready to march, as some attendees at the screening clearly felt they were. He noted the positive changes he’s seen over the years – people donating time, people of standing standing up, mainstream hospitality businesses seeing T&T Pride events as a market.

But what’s the right fit for Pride here, several people who spoke asked. Parade of the Bands, one person was convinced: community members should play mas together in the same Carnival band, perhaps in Pride colours; didn’t the GLBT Bajan posse show out here this year? And, although one person warned us to be more modest (Barbados and Suriname may challenge us in that regard), speaker after speaker talked about pride in how far “ahead” of the rest of the region things are for our community in T&T. Aren’t there ways outside of a parade to gain visibility, one person wondered: Why not have winners of the very popular gender illusion pageants appear on TV and do newspaper features.

 

"B. Conduct which adversely affects the USC community: 10. Public or clandestine meetings/relations with members of the same or opposite sex, which may include illicit behaviour such as homosexuality, lesbianism," (p. 48) © University of the Southern Caribbean

CYAISO? Students from UWI, USC and COSTAATT were all present, and shared some amazing efforts, small but brave, that they are undertaking to support each other and make their campuses safer spaces. Some are exploring ways they can share the skills and training they are acquiring with the GLBT community, offering peer counselling as a community service to others struggling with sexual orientation, gender identity and family issues.

What do we want? Nobody at all talked about same-sex marriage. Many people talked about the need to do internal work within the community to build dignity, self-respect and pride as being a priority of the first order. One young man talked about how the gender pageants did that for him. Make activities like Friends for Life’s chatroom happen more regularly, and do better work at publicizing them. Create similar activities for women. Plan workshops during Pride month. Create mentoring programmes. Routinely have information and resource tables set up at community events like the film screening. People talked about the need for legal protections against employment and housing discrimination; about the continued ability of murderers of gay men to successfully use as a defence the assertion that the victim came on to them. People told personal stories about the cost of coming out, being forced to leave home and losing relationships with family. One student shared that her school’s handbook says you can be expelled for being gay. And one person advanced the idea of CAISO forming constituency groups in each of the nation’s 41 constituencies, “like the PNM did in 1956”.

Velvet Underground. Organizer Angela Francis talked at length about the recent growth of her group to close to 1,000 members, and her vision for creating a lounge in the East providing sexual and mental health services, other community supports, and office space – as well as her challenge in getting community members to support the vision. The founder of Queen Mother touted the new blog.

Well-known people were there, and spoke up. The DJ for a controversial radio host promised to back us up with a big truck whenever we were “ready to be serious” about a Pride parade. (So don’t let him off the hook!)

The event worked so well and so simply, we’ve simply decided to do it again. And maybe again and again every month or two.

Look out for notices from us and Bohemia about something in April. Probably Sunday the 11th.